Song #14: Are You Dizzy?

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This week’s song is another from Piti Theatre’s Greatest Bits, Vol. I.  I like this tune because we took a grim topic, microwave sickness and the lack of medical understanding around it, and gave it what I call “the creepy circus treatment”….the end result is weird, bleakly funny, and appropriately sinister.   Here’s what Jonathan has to say about writing this song:

“After Piti co-director Godeliève Richard developed microwave sickness in 2010, we spent a few years going from doctor to healer to doctor trying to find out what was wrong. One stop was at an Ear, Nose & Throat specialist in Northampton, MA. She had been continuously dizzy for about two years and this was a person who specialized in dizzyness. As he moved her head with surprising force from side to side, he asked her questions like “are you dizzy like you’re on a boat?” “Are you dizzy like the room is spinning?”, etc. This was the inspiration for this song and became fodder for a scene in our microwave sickness musical “Innocenzo“.

These days, Jonathan and Godeliève have launched a new project with others from the region called Hilltown Health. One of the goals is to help towns adapt their by-laws to be more protective against the 5G cellular network being rolled out which will put a mini cell tower every hundred yards or so on our roads and strip towns of their zoning rights.

For more information:

More about microwave sickness (also known as electrical sensitivity)

Dizzy

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Are You Dizzy?
By Jonathan Mirin and Carrie Ferguson
Performed by Carrie Ferguson; Bass, Percussion, Mandolin: Garrett Sawyer
Recorded by Garrett Sawyer at Northfire Recording Studio
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia at Northfire recording Studio

Are you dizzy like you’re on a boat?
Are you dizzy like you’re swimming ‘round a moat?
Are you dizzy like you’re floating off the ground?
Are you dizzy like you’re gonna drown?

Are you dizzy and your head just spins?
Are you dizzy like you just had twins?
Are you dizzy and the room is spinning?
Are you dizzy like the lights are dimming?

Oh whoa, oh oh oh oh
Oh whoa, no no no no
So busy feelin’ dizzy that you don’t know where to go

Are you dizzy and it doesn’t make sense?
Are you dizzy and its makin’ you tense?
Are you dizzy and your ears are ringing?
Are you dizzy and your brain is zinging?

Are you dizzy like a merry go round?
Are you dizzy like you’re upside down?
Dizzy like an ant in a dixie cup?
Are you dizzy like you’re gonna throw up?

Oh whoa, oh oh oh oh
Oh whoa, no no no no
So busy feelin’ dizzy that you don’t know where to go

Oh whoa, oh oh oh oh
Oh whoa, no no no no
So busy feelin’ dizzy that you don’t know where to go

Song #13: North River Song

North River

Well, I am sick of winter and ready for summer, or at least Spring.  How about you?

This week’s song is an ode to all things river-related and is another one from Piti Theatre’s mini-musical, “Olde Coleraine” about the town of Colrain in Western Massachusetts.  The little black and white drawing next to the song above is a sketch Godelieve Richard did of me performing in the show.

Here’s a blurb from  Piti Theatre’s Bandcamp page:

“The North River runs through Colrain, MA and is a tributary of the Deerfield River, joining the Deerfield just above Shelburne Falls at a spot known now as “Sunburn Beach.” In the 1800’s the North River was home to a variety of mills and around these mills were small villages where mill workers lived. Children were part of the labor force but these small communities within Olde Coleraine also had their own one room schoolhouses. ‘North River’ is part of the musical “Olde Coleraine” that was originally developed for Suzanne Taylor’s 3rd grade class at Colrain Central School. This residency led to a full production for the public at Piti Theatre’s 7th Annual SYRUP: One Sweet Performing Art Festival in 2016 featuring local actors and young people. These efforts were made possible by the Mass Cultural Council STARS program and Mass Humanities.”

I can’t wait to go swimming!

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North River Song
Words by Jonathan Mirin, Music by Carrie Ferguson
Performed by Carrie Ferguson; Bass: Tommy Byrnes
Recorded by Tommy Byrnes at Sovereignty Music, Bernardston, MA
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia at Northfire Recording Studio, Amherst, MA

It’s been a long winter
up on Catamont hill
and it’s been a long winter
down in Griswoldville

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

So . . .
Let’s go swimmin’
yeah
down in the North River
five nice spots to choose from
that’s just countin’ the close ones
still mighty cold when you’re not in the sun

It’s been a long winter
down in Adamsville
and it’s been a long winter
out in Lyonsville

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

Let’s go fishin’
yeah
down in the North River
four nice spots to choose from
we can go when work is all done
when we’ve caught enough we let’em run

It’s been a long winter
up in Gimletville
and it’s been a long winter
down in Shattuckville

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

So . . .
Let’s go picnicin’ yeah
down by the North River
three nice spots to choose from
pack bread and apple pie thick as your thumb
watch the birds come and eat our crumbs

It’s been a long winter
down at Elm Grove
and it’s been a long winter
huddled round the stove

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

So . . .
Let’s go crossin’
yeah
let’s cross the rivers
two rivers to choose from
the North and West Branch are the ones
build enough bridges to get things done

It’s been a long winter
at Taylor Brook
when the wind blew
those sawmills shook

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

Let’s get on the trolley
yeah
down by the North River
we’ve only one track to choose from
keep the windows open and sit with your chum
listen to your heart beat like a drum

So let’s go let’s go let’s go . . .
Down by the river
(another day at the mill)
Down by the river
(we can drink our fill)
Down by the river

So let’s go let’s go let’s go . . .
Down by the river
(we’ll swim every day)
Down by the river
(we’ll fish our way)
Down by the river

So let’s go let’s go let’s go . . .
Down by the river
(Down from the ridge)
Down by the river
(across the covered bridge)
Down by the river

So let’s go let’s go let’s go . . .
Down by the river
(no need for a boat)
Down by the river
(let yourself float )
Down by the river

It’s been a long winter
up on Catamont Hill
and it’s been a long winter
down in Griswoldville

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

but now we’re planting seeds
and the air is still
down by the river
surrounded by hills

Song #12: The Electric Road

trolley sized

Song # 12:  Electric Road

Hey, did you know there used to be an electric trolley running between the towns of Colrain and Shelburne Falls in Western Massachusetts?

The Shelburne Falls and Colrain Street Railway operated from late 1896 to late 1927 and carried freight and passengers through what was known as “Colrain City” down to Foundry Village, Griswoldville, Lyonsville, Adamsville, Shattuckville, Elm Groove and other hamlets before reaching Shelburne Falls.  At the South end of the 7 mile line, at the Buckland station across the Deerfield River from Shelburne Falls, you could connect with the Boston and Maine Railroad and the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad.

“In 1927, faced with mounting debt, the SF&C ceased operation and was sold at foreclosure. The line was scrapped in 1928. The only surviving equipment of the SF&C is the 32’9” eight-wheel Combination Baggage-Passenger car #10, manufactured by the Wason company of Springfield, MA in 1896. The car has been fully restored to operating condition and today resides at the Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum at the site of the old Buckland depot where it is used for recreational rides in the same freight yard where passengers, apples, mail, milk and other freight were loaded and unloaded one hundred years ago.”  (Wikipedia)

I didn’t know about any of this until Piti Theatre was hired a few years ago to do a residency with the 3rd graders at Colrain Central School.  Working with a local Colrain historian, Piti Director Jonathan Mirin wrote a beautiful mini-musical about Colrain history featuring songs about the trolley, the local rivers, and children working in the mills.

For more information about Colrain’s “Electric Road” and the rural landscape/society it ran through, check out this interesting article in the Greenfield Recorder.

That must have been one gorgeous train ride!

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Electric Road by Jon Mirin and Carrie Ferguson
Recorded and Mixed by Tommy Byrnes at Sovereignty Music Services
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia at Northfire Music Studio

Hey hey look at them go
They’re gonna make an electric road
Hey hey what do you know
Trolley’s gonna carry all of our loads

Put on the milk and the mail
Put on the apples and head down the trail
It’s a beautiful day
We don’t have to walk we can ride the whole way!

Hey hey when we grow old
Will we still ride the electric road
Hey hey what do you know
Don’t need a car to go faster than slow

Get your family and friends
We’ve got people to see and letters to send
Get on the trolley go to town
Hear the trolley makin’ it’s sound

Ding ding, the conductor rings
Click clack, roll down the track
Ding ding, the conductor rings
Click clack, roll down the track

Get your family and friends
We’ve got people to see and letters to send
Get on the trolley go to town
Hear the trolley makin’ it’s sound

Ding ding, the conductor rings
Click clack, roll down the track
Ding ding, the conductor rings
Click clack, roll down the track

Put on the milk and the mail
Put on the apples and head down the trail
It’s a beautiful day
We don’t have to walk we can ride the whole way!

Hey hey when we grow old
Will we still ride the electric road
Hey hey what do you know
Don’t need a car to go faster than slow

Hey hey when we grow old
Will we still ride the electric road
Hey hey when we grow old
Will we still ride the electric road

Johari Window

Johariwindow

Song #11:  The Fishbowl Song

(lyrics below)

I’ve decided to take a little break this week from Piti Theatre songs.  I’ll resume next week with another selection from our new CD, Piti Theatre’s Greatest Bits, Vol. I.  This week, I want to reflect a bit on how I learned to Communicate, with a capital “C”.

In the early 90’s, when I was an undergraduate student at U-Mass Amherst, I was part of a student-run cooperative vegetarian restaurant called Earthfoods.  We served lunch 5 days a week, 9 months out of the year.   The food was cheap and good and the servings were huge.  We served about 300 students, staff and faculty members a day.  Because the business was cooperatively managed, we had a big “All-Staff” meeting once a week.  Management was divided into a bunch of different committees which supervised various aspects of running the business: menu planning, budget, paper products, hiring, etc.  (I was on the Spice committee, though I never did find out what that meant exactly). Decisions were made by consensus, so the meetings were sometimes very long.

Earthfoods  is where I learned to have good communication hygiene.  Our advisor, an older grad-student who basically served as mentor, den mother, and therapist, would do presentations at All-Staff coaching us on how to give constructive feed back. This is where I learned about  Non-Violent Communication and the all-powerful “I -Statement”.  For example:  “When you (insert action) I feel  (insert feeling).”

The idea of being aware of and owning one’s own perspective when communicating with others, particularly when having conflict, was gutsy and revolutionary to me.  Theoretically, it was a tool that could be applied to romantic relationships, work relationships, friendships, family, possibly even politics, though I quickly discovered that it seemed to work best when all players were basically equal with little power differentiation, and when everyone had agreed to participate.

I learned about the Johari Window at  Earthfoods.  It has a mysterious sounding name but is actually just a combination of the the names of its two psychologist inventors, Joseph Luft and Harrington Ingham.  I’ve always been intrigued by the idea that we have  several, perhaps many, different selves, some that we present to the world knowingly or unknowingly, some that we keep totally hidden.

Thinking about all this stuff was the very beginning for me of growing a core self that did not automatically wobble and blow around, crumble, dissolve, shrink, vanish, disappear, mutate, blend, accommodate, apologize, or abandon ship when I came in contact with an opposing, or even welcoming force/personality.

The challenge of learning to listen, observe, feel, communicate and engage from a place of both personal power and humility, with flexibility and grace, has turned out to be a life-long, and extremely rewarding, process.

In my twenties, newly in love, newly separated from my parents, newly out, and just plain new new new in general, I used my songs as tools to puzzle through and articulate these ideas.  (Geez, I still do.)  This song is another one from that era.

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The Fishbowl Song
Written and performed by Carrie Ferguson
Recorded, mixed and mastered by Tommy Byrnes at Sovereignty Music Services
Album: Walking Songs

Well I’ve been feeling crazy, feel like I’m out of my mind
Feel like I’m standing at the bottom of a fish bowl staring up at time
I don’t know about love, but that’s the only word I know
For what I feel when I’m standing next to you or thinking ‘bout you when I’m alone

One thing I can say (one thing I can say)
I’m gonna stick around (I’m gonna stick around)
Connect my head in the sky with my feet on the ground

Cause the wind keeps blowing and the river keeps flowing
Sometimes I forget I’m free
Green green growing, who knows where we’re going
But I’ve got a light on in me, yeah, I’ve got a light on in me

Sometimes things get complicated, useless conversations get reincarnated
Beating each other with capital ‘C’s, yelling “don’t you Communicate at me”
Well, all we really want is to be loved, all we really want is to be held
Won’t you take me to your body and hold my hand
And kiss me as you tell me that you’re trying to understand

One thing I can say (one thing I can say)
I’m gonna stick around (I’m gonna stick around)
Connect my head in the sky with my feet on the ground

Cause the wind keeps blowing and the river keeps flowing
Sometimes I forget I’m free
Green green growing, who knows where we’re going
But I’ve got a light on in me, yeah, I’ve got a light on in me

Well you know I’m gonna marry myself someday, until I’m ready I’ll wear this ring
round my neck, on a string
That don’t mean I plan to live my life alone, it only means I plan to love myself
And if we’re gonna love each other might as well do it now
I thought I had the answers but I’m still learning how
To give what I can and get what I need and recognize the things that make me bleed

One thing I can say (one thing I can say)
I’m gonna stick around (I’m gonna stick around)
Connect my head in the sky with my feet on the ground

Cause the wind keeps blowing and the river keeps flowing
Sometimes I forget I’m free
Green green growing, who knows where we’re going
But I’ve got a light on in me, yeah, I’ve got a light on in me

Change is all there is, Baby.

volcano

Song #10:  I’m A Rock Going Through Changes

 

Download:

(See below for lyrics)

This is another song from my new CD with Piti Theatre, ‘Piti Theatre’s Greatest Bits, Vol. I’. (For the whole story about my collaboration with Piti, and this project in particular, please see post #8).

Like last week’s song, ‘I’m A Rock Going Through Changes’ was written for a residency about rocks that Piti Theatre did at the Ryan Road School in Florence, MA.  Jon and Godelieve spent a week at the school teaching third graders about rocks and creating a play.  This song was performed by the students (accompanied by me disguised as “Carrie Keys” with an elaborate wig and sparkly gold boots) in the final show for the school and parents.

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I’m A Rock Going Through Changes

By Jonathan Mirin and Carrie Ferguson
Recorded and Mixed by Garrett Sawyer at Northfire Recording Studio, Amherst, MA
Co-produced by Carrie Ferguson and Garrett Sawyer
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia

Well…..I started off deep in the planet as magma (ma, ma, ma, ma, ma)
Then I got shot out of a volcano in Japan (an, an, an, an, an)
Didn’t know who or what or where I was (uz, uz, uz, uz, uz)
Then a geologist told me I was lava (va, va, va, va, va)
Until I cooled down, she said “Now you’re igneous!”

I Said “Excuse me? Oh well, in that case, it seems completely clear that….

I’m a rock that’s going through changes
I’m a rock that’s going through changes

Now, there’s two things can happen (pen, pen, pen, pen, pen)

“Do you guys have to keep doing that?”
“Sorry!” “We’re rocking out!”

Anyway……I could get pushed underground, heated up and pressurized
Until I turn metamorphic (ick, ick, ick, ick, ick,)
Or I might get weathered away broken down begrudged bedraggled into little Pieces of mud and dirt and bone called sediments (ents, ents, ents, ents, ents,)
Then those sediments might get packed down on the sea floor and turned into Sedimentary rock because

You’re going through changes
Don’t I know it’s true!
I’m a rock that’s going through changes

Now, if I start on the sea floor I will yes again
Become metamorphic (ick, ick, ick, ick, ick)
Then I might get thrust up and weathered down
Into sediment (ent, ent, ent, ent, ent)
Now, it this is sounding familiar, well…
It should because that’s what I mean by cycle! (cull, cull, cull, cull, cull)

Or if I’m pushed once more deep down beneath the sea floor
I’ll turn into magma (ma, ma, ma, ma, ma)
Then I might come up to the surface somewhere else or get shot out of a totally different volcano in a totally different place because millions of years have gone by (by, by, by, by, by)

Now guess what happens?
Who can tell me what happens?
Let me see your hands in the air..
Yes sir-ee, who can tell me what might happen once again when
That lava that was once magma cools down and becomes….
What does the lava become?
Igneous!
Igneous, that’s right and that should sound very familiar because…

You’re going through changes…
Change is all there is baby!
You’re a rock that’s going through changes!
Everybody now!
I’m going through changes
I’m a rock that’s going through changes!
Tell it like it is!
I’m going through changes
You know it’s true!
I’m a rock that’s going through changes!
Let me hear you!
I’m going through changes!
Last time!
I’m a rock that’s going through changes!
That’s what I’m talking about!

 

Rock Cycle

3 kinds of rock

Song #9 :  Three Kinds of Rock

 

Download

Three Kinds of Rock (Lyrics below)

Here’s another song from my new CD with Piti Theatre, ‘Piti Theatre’s Greatest Bits, Vol. I’. (For the whole story about this project, please see my preceding post).

‘Three Kinds of Rock’ was written for a Piti residency at the Ryan Road School in Florence, MA.  Jon and Godelieve spent a week at the school teaching third graders about rocks and creating a play.  This song was performed by the students (accompanied by me wearing a long curly black wig, gold boots and horn-rimmed glasses) in the final show for the school and parents.  I hope you enjoy it!

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Three Kinds of Rock
by Jonathan Mirin and Carrie Ferguson

Piano and vocals: Carrie Ferguson
Recorded and Mixed by Garrett Sawyer at Northfire Studio, Amherst, MA
Co-produced by Garrett Sawyer and Carrie Ferguson
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia at Northfire Studio

We are three kinds of rock
One two three
We are three kinds of rock
That make our planet be
Metamorphic and igneous and sedimentary
Three kinds of rock
One two three!

My name is sedimentary and I love to settle down
I’m the kind of rock where fossils can be found
Sediment is mud and sand and gravel and clay
It washes down the rivers and out into the bays
Millions of years go by and sediment gets compressed
Oceans dry up and real Mount Everest

We are three kinds of rock
One two three
We are three kinds of rock
That reveal Earth’s history
Metamorphic and igneous and sedimentary
Three kinds of rock

My name is igneous and igneous means fire
I’m the second kind of rock and I never grow tired
Deep in the Earth there’s magma, melting rocks that blow your mind
Spat out by volcanoes as lava all the time
Or it bubbles up to the crust and there it slowly cools
Then it turns into igneous
Those are the rocky rules!

We are three kinds of rock
One two three
We are three kinds of rock
Found on land and sea
Metamorphic and igneous and sedimentary
Three kinds of rock

My name is metamorphic, heat and pressure press on me
And change me from igneous or sedimentary
Sometimes I’m swirly and sometimes I’m smooth
It depends on how I was cooked and hot the other rocks
made their grooves

We are three kinds of rock
One two three
We are three kinds of rock
That reveal Earth’s history
Metamorphic and igneous and sedimentary
Three kinds of rock

We are three kinds of rock
One two three
We are three kinds of rock
That make our planet be
Metamorphic and igneous and sedimentary
Three kinds of rock
One two three!

Piti Theatre and Me!

Song #8: Electromagnet (That’s What I Am)

thumbnailPainting by Godelieve Richards

Download

Piti Theatre and Me!  (See below for lyrics to ‘Electromagnet’)

About 8 years ago, I played an opening set for a movie at Pot Hole Pictures, a classic film series in Shelburne Falls, MA.  Although it’s not a paid gig, playing at PHP is sort of a rite of passage for independent musicians in Western MA.  The weekly event takes place in a once-grand, historical building called Memorial Hall.  The police department is downstairs and upstairs is a huge, beautifully funky old ballroom/theater.  On the weekends they show popular old movies and they always have a local musician as the opener. That night it was just me and the piano.  The piano was an ancient upright set up on a wheeled dolly to make it more portable and there was one of those antique wooden piano stools with crystal claw feet.  The seat was stuck at the highest setting and if I sat on it I could reach the keys but  my feet barely touched the ground and the whole thing kept swinging to the left.  I don’t remember the movie.  Only about 20 people were in the audience.  I got paid with chewy popcorn.  It was a fun night with a sweet vibe.

I’m giving you all the details of this gig just to reiterate the often-pointed out point that life, (specifically MY life and my own music career), often unfolds through a series of random and inauspicious events.  Especially starting out as a musician, you never know what gig will lead you to the next thing.  If I hadn’t done that gig, I might not be doing the work I get to do today.

After the show I was approached by a couple who introduced themselves as Jonathan Mirin and Godelieve Richards.  They said they had a local theater company called Piti Theatre.   Godelieve liked my song about obsessive thinking, ‘Song For My Addiction’, and they wanted to do a choreographed dance to it. “Sure!” I said.

They ended up instead choreographing a dance to my song ‘Small White Rock’, but that was the beginning of us working together.  They asked me if I wanted to collaborate with them on a “play with music” they were doing.  The idea was that I would co-write songs with Jon, plus write other music for the show.  It would be an educational piece for children and adults, entertaining and humorous, but dealing with an intense subject: Colony Collapse Disorder in bee hives.  I’ve always wanted to write for musical theater and this was actually going to be a paid job so I felt pretty excited.  But, I was also skeptical.  It seemed like a depressing subject for a kid’s show.

CDC is indeed a depressing subject, but I quickly discovered that Piti Theatre has a way of making wonderfully entertaining, educational, poignant, smart, FUNNY art out of some of the trickiest subjects around.

I have to just say right here, that Jon and Godelieve are two of the most dedicated, hardest working artists I have ever met.  Together they form Piti Theatre and they each wear a bunch of different hats:  Jon writes, directs, teaches, and does all the booking, promotion, grant-writing and fund-raising; Godelieve co-designs the shows, designs and builds all the sets, props and costumes, plus does the choreography.   They are also dedicated activists: many of the shows they create have a strong environmental/social justice message.  They are using their art to change the world and I feel really honored to get to be a part of it.

‘To Bee Or Not to Bee’ was our first project together and since then we’ve collaborated on about 9 different shows, with various themes, which we have performed in public schools, libraries, festivals, and community centers throughout New England.

Two years ago, Piti and I received  a two-thousand dollar grant from Club Passim in Boston, via the Iguana Fund.  We used the money to help make a compilation of 16 of our favorite songs from some of the “mini-musicals” we’ve done.  This collection is a pot pouri of songs covering many different subjects/themes and includes songs from educational residencies at public schools as well as songs from our two touring plays, ‘To Bee or Not To Bee’, and ‘Innocenzo’.  It took us awhile, but we’re finally finished and will be releasing the record, ‘Piti Theatre’s Greatest Bits, Vol. I’, this Spring 2018.  I love all of these songs and am really excited to share them with people!

For the next 15 weeks or so I’ll be posting songs from this collection. This week’s song is called ‘Electromagnet (That’s What I Am)’ and was performed in a show with third graders as the culmination of a residency studying magnets at the Ryan Road School in Florence, MA.

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Electromagnet Song
by Jonathan Mirin and Carrie Ferguson

Performed by Carrie Ferguson
Bass and Guitar: Tommy Byrnes; Clapping: Ian Byrnes and Carrie Ferguson
Recorded and Mixed by Tommy Byrnes at Sovereignty Music, Bernardston, MA
Mastered by Angelo Quaglia, Northfire Studio, Amherst, MA

What’s the secret of my force?
Electric current, it’s a powerful force
I’m an Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star

I got a wire coil inside of me
Flowing with electricity
Wrapped around a metal core
Of ferromagnetic soft iron ore

Electromagnet, that’s what I am
Electromagnet, let me say it again
Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star

Well, I get a lot of work in industry
In loudspeakers, generators, MRI machines
You can use me to make your motor go
All I need is that electric flow

Electromagnet, that’s what I am
Electromagnet, let me say it again
Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star

Yeah!
Whoah!
Uh huh!
Hey!

When you flip the switch and the voltage flows
The stronger the current, the stronger I pull
But when you turn me off, I must confess
I’m just another weak magnet like all of the rest

Electromagnet, that’s what I am
Electromagnet, let me say it again
Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star

Yeah!
Whoah!
Uh huh!
Hey!

Electromagnet, that’s what I am
Electromagnet, let me say it again
Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star

Yeah, electromagnet, that’s what I am
Electromagnet, let me say it again
Electromagnet, I can lift a car
Electromagnet, I’m a magnet star